Easy for you to say… now learn the basics.

In the world of healthy ecosystems and sustainable landscapes, there is no substitute, and no way to make it without mycorrhizal fungi. That is why Tree of Life plants are uniquely grown with special care to include these beneficial fungi on each root system. Our plants are strong and ready to adapt to their new home at your job site. They are made vigorous by mycorrhizae, the only sustainable way to assure long-term health in both the soil and the plants.

The term mycorrhiza (in plural, mycorrhizae or mycorrhizas), implies the association of a fungus and a root. It is derived from the greek word “mykes” that means fungus and the latin word “rhiza” which means root. However, it has also been used to describe a mutualistic symbiosis because generally both partners obtain benefits from their interaction. Mycorrhizal fungi produce filaments called hyphae that grow in and around the roots developing a network that helps the plant to acquire mineral nutrients from the soil. In exchange, the fungus receives a place to live and carbohydrates for its own growth.

Root colonization by mycorrhizal fungi is known to benefit plant growth by enhancing nutrient uptake, by increasing tolerance to water and salt stress, and resistance against soil-borne pathogens. In situations of low fertility, drought, and salinity, mycorrhizal plants often outperform the nonmycorrhizal plants.

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Mycorrhizal fungi are abundant in the soils of most terrestrial ecosystems, but our plants are grown in soilless mixes that do not contain these beneficial microorganisms.  We incorporate the mycorrhizal inoculum at the moment of transplanting, either by mixing the inoculant in the seed or cutting mixes or by adding it to the planting hole.

There are different types of mycorrhizal associations formed by different groups of fungi with different plants, but most of the species propagated at Tree of Life Nursery form associations with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi.

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